Sesame Oil

Sesame oil contains vitamin E, which can help protect skin cells from the damage caused by environmental factors, such as UV rays, pollution, and toxins. Sesame oil also contains several phenolic compounds, which give it its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These compounds include:

  • Tocopherol
  • Pinoresinol
  • Sesamin
  • Sesamolin
  • Sesaminol
  • Sesamol

It also contains several essential fatty acids. These acids are effective moisturizers that can help keep your skin supple, soft, and hydrated.

  • Oleic acid
  • Palmitic acid
  • Stearic acid
  • Linoleic acid

More Information

Benefits and uses of sesame oil:

  • High in antioxidants. Sesame oil contains sesamol and sesaminol, two antioxidants that may have powerful effects on your health. …
  • Has strong anti-inflammatory properties. …
  • Good for your heart. …
  • May help control blood sugar. …
  • May help treat arthritis. …
  • May help heal wounds and burns. …
  • May protect against UV rays.

Sesame oil is derived from the seeds of the flowering sesame plant, also known as Sesamumindicum. These plants are native to East Africa and India, but they’re currently grown in many countries around the world.

Due to its hearty, nutty flavor and its high levels of mono- and polyunsaturated fats, sesame oil has become one of the most popular oils for cooking.

But does it have benefits beyond the kitchen? Is it a good oil to use on your skin? Read on to learn more about the properties of this oil, and what it can and can’t do for your skin.

What are the benefits of using sesame oil on your skin?

Sesame oil has the following properties, which help to make it a beneficial oil for your skin:

  • Antioxidant. This means it has the ability to fight damage by free radicals, or unstable molecules that can harm the cellular structure of your skin.
  • Antimicrobial. This means it can kill harmful microorganisms or stop their growth.
  • Anti-inflammatory. This means it can reduce inflammation and swelling.

Sesame oil also has a moderately low rating on the comedogenic scale. This unofficial database ranks different oils and butters by their pore-clogging properties. The scale ranges from zero to five.

A rating of zero means that oil won’t clog your pores, while a rating of five means that it will.

According to a 1989 study published in the Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, refined sesame oil has a comedogenic rating of one, and unrefined sesame oil has a rating of three. Non-comedogenic oils, like sesame oil, are good options for many types of skin.

Because non-comedogenic oils don’t clog pores, sesame oil may work well on acne-prone skin. Sesame oil’s anti-inflammatory properties may also add to its acne-fighting abilities, although there’s currently no scientific data to back this up.

Although studies on sesame oil are limited, especially with regards to skin care benefits, there have been some discoveries about its antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties.

What nutrients does sesame oil have?

Sesame oil contains vitamin E, which can help protect skin cells from the damage caused by environmental factors, such as UV rays, pollution, and toxins. Sesame oil also contains several phenolic compounds, which give it its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These compounds include:

  • Tocopherol
  • Pinoresinol
  • Sesamin
  • Sesamolin
  • Sesaminol
  • Sesamol

It also contains several essential fatty acids. These acids are effective moisturizers that can help keep your skin supple, soft, and hydrated.

  • Oleic acid
  • Palmitic acid
  • Stearic acid
  • Linoleic acid